Dominick Dunne

Before I could express my thoughts on Dominick Dunne I had to look into two other names: Truman Capote and Andy Warhol.

Warhol was primarily a commercial artist and he was extremely successful at it.

Capote is the more pertinent artist in relation to Dunne. His relationship to Harper Lee is a stunning education and as a child he worked at it and declared himself a writer at age eleven. From there he only elevated his craft through his efforts and schooling in New York City. Born in 1925, Capote hit it big with the publication of Breakfast at Tiffany’s in 1958. He described his career as “before and after” the release of the short novel.

Capote attended trials as a kid with Ms. Lee. After Breakfast he is best-known for In Cold Blood, true crime with a lot of fiction mixed-in or roman a clef.

All three were and are unusual characters as males. They were driven and highly successful. All might also be described as effeminate or gay; picked-on could be another description. Each prospered as an artist.

power, privilege, and justice

Detectives spent three years working on the investigation, which ultimately found that Michael Skakel had “in all probability killed” Moxley, according to Dunne’s characterization. The detectives hired the 24-year-old who ultimately met with Dunne to turn the investigation into a narrative. Rushton Skakel stashed the report away, according to Dunne.

https://www.businessinsider.com/how-dominick-dunne-revived-interest-in-martha-moxley-2013-10

http://thesuttonreport.com/The%20Sutton%20Report/searchablesutton.html

Steven Wayne Benson.

Filthy Rich

Lesson: don’t read Roger Ebert reviews (since he died).

I think it just came out. I mean within the last few days. I was able to download it and…

I watched in the background without paying attention. The beginning episode flew by. By the second one, I knew it was something deeper and better. I found myself rewinding the third one a lot. But I was done for one day anyway.

On Day 2 I paid more attention to episodes 3 and 4. Again I found myself making sure I followed episode 3. The final episode went by pretty fast. It is over and he is dead.

But I am very glad the victims found a form of closure.

It is good because skilled documentary producers have a way of making you see things you didn’t or couldn’t see on your own. It is pretty remarkable really, because the whole thing is only maybe two hours, about feature film length.

It is great that the Vanity Fair woman started it because, she started it. Julie K. Brown did not appear, because she did not need to.

The rest of the characters are excellent. Dershowitz (legal and ethical are the same thing to him) and the Prince look like buffoons; Maxwell and others are just as guilty as Epstein. Acosta resigned. Judge Berman (no relation to D.A. Berman) set a new tone for victims. Epstein is dead (I already covered that). Some people did honorable work, e.g., Palm Beach police. Journalists in particular–Ms. Brown and others–virtually brought him down when others could not.

Everyone who is still alive only has to live with themself.

“I’m not Jane Doe, I am Courtney Wild.”

Good stuff.

The Mormons, part 1 video

https://www.pbs.org/video/frontline-the-mormons-part-one/

This, Part 1, is exceptional. These people know what they are talking about and they are worth listening-to.

The scene I remember most is the one of the single mother with two daughters and a son walking from Illinois to Utah. Earlier, or I think this woman was one of them, the episode told the story of a woman recruited from the U.K. for the trek only to be told to build a cart and go.

This woman’s son died of starvation along the way and she was pleased it happened. Pleased he was put out of his misery is one way to look at it, we will be stronger and make it to the end of our journey is another. The mother embraced the latter position and this cuts to the heart of blood revenge or blood atonement. It is similar or worse than killing or harming disbelievers. It is okay if it is in the name of the religion.

Today it would be could be considered manslaughter or child endangerment.

I learned concepts like communitas, initiations, and rites of passage studying cultural anthropology a long time ago.

Both Joseph Smith and Brigham Young used them to create a massive enterprise. Smith and his family were “downwardly mobile” and Young was a 30-year old go-nowhere carpenter in Ohio. People would listen to them and they amassed great power and led that multi-billion dollar organization. Neither had any higher or formal education nor were either ever elected to any public office.

Smith was removed from every place he lived as a result and was finally murdered. Palmyra, NY, Kirtland, OH, the Garden of Eden in Jackson County, MO, and finally Nauvoo, IL. That is Americana. He was exiled and killed by the other Americans.

He was arrested some 30 times in his 39-year life for charges ranging from disorderly person/fraud to bank fraud, to treason, to conspiracy to murder. His profession–treasure hunting on poor farmland–may have been legal but staring into a hat and claiming to see where gold is buried, and taking money for it, is not.

https://www.josephsmithpapers.org/paper-summary/introduction-to-state-of-missouri-v-gates-et-al-for-treason/1

https://famous-trials.com/carthrage/1316-treasonwarrant

Kingdom of Nauvoo.

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2020/03/30/how-joseph-smith-and-the-early-mormons-challenged-american-democracy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polygamy_in_North_America

When Smith was killed he was in serious legal trouble and facing treason charges in both Missouri and Illinois. He is not a martyr, he was a criminal.

Under Young the Mormons fled to Utah Territory. They had amassed money (Smith with his office over the general store, and the banking; I don’t know when tithing started.) They sent missionaries or scouts and every destination was legal or acquired at the time.

Utah was part of Mexico.

One thing about Americana is the law has never changed. Towns, companies, religions, and even cultures may come and go but the Constitution, except for a small number of amendments, has not changed.

Mormonism was formed under or because of freedom of religion in the United States (i.e., the Constitution). What I found best about the program is that it describes how it has been restrained since inception because of those laws. That is the concept of theocracy.

Wherever Joseph Smith tried he was kicked-out by the locals. Sometimes it was more legal than others, but it was accepted by the majority and/or powers that be at the time. His ideas or practices were not acceptable to the majority of the people or elected authorities where he and his followers lived and he was removed. Once this was by the governor of Missouri.

At the time it was different than ‘We’ll put you in jail and throw away the key’ (e.g., Warren Jeffs). They didn’t have the FBI or a lot of other resources. It was done in more forceful ways.

He seems to have had an incredible, look you in the eye charisma as well as sexual charm.

In reference to the May 25 letter to the editor “Mormon polygamists forced to follow laws,” and the claim that polygamy was not illegal in the United States before mormons practiced polygamy:

The Illinois anti-bigamy law enacted February 12, 1833 : “Sec 121. Bigamy consists in the having of two wives or two husbands at one and the same time, knowing that the former husband or wife is still alive. If any person or persons within this State,

https://www.standard.net/opinion/anti-bigamy-law-enacted-in/article_12a47fd2-677d-5721-965a-3410a2338c98.html

being married, or who shall hereafter marry, do at any time marry any person or persons, the former husband or wife being alive, the person so offending shall, on conviction thereof, be punished by a fine, not exceeding one thousand dollars, and imprisoned in the penitentiary, not exceeding two years. It shall not be necessary to prove either of the said marriages by the register or certificate thereof, or other record evidence; but the same may be proved by such evidence as is admissible to prove a marriage in other cases, and when such second marriage shall have taken place without this state, cohabitation in this state after such second marriage shall be deemed the commission of the crime of bigamy, and the trial in such case may take

place in the county where such cohabitation shall have occurred.” Revised Laws of Illinois, 1833, p.198-99.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_and_territories_by_historical_population

Illinois population 1830: 157,500

Illinois population 1840: 457,000

Illinois population 1850: 851,500

Nauvoo population at peak (around 1842): 13,000

Hancock County pop. 1840: 9,946 1850: 14,652 1860: 29,061 etc.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hancock_County,_Illinois

https://www.c-span.org/video/?469733-1/kingdom-nauvoo

One two

One. Two.

But first, what I have learned about narcissism.

There was a storyline in the sitcom Friends that there is no real good dead; if it makes you feel good, then it is not unselfish. Most, or many people have narcissistic tendencies, particularly if they are ambitious, confident, or other such adjectives. These people are not “dangerous” in any way. In addition, there are narcissistic disorders (malignant narcissism or psychopath) where narcissists become abusive or even a danger to others.

The basic premise is to look more inwardly than outwardly. For me, the degree of severity–or danger–is best gauged through empathy. Those with malignant narcissism want to or don’t care about hurting others.

It is rooted in one’s upbringing. Factors such as mirroring, entitlement, abuse (sexual or otherwise), discipline, or a lack of affection or attention influence it. It could be called inherited.

A key component (I learned this from Dr. _____) on Youtube, is me against you or them. I am right and you are wrong. This includes difficulty appreciating or loving people for who they are. Taken further, contentiousness and conflict.

ONE

Steven Powell, the father of killer Josh Powell, is as disgusting an individual as I have ever seen. I cannot forget the police interview videos of him. He is smirking and smiling and all the while talking about his infatuation with his son’s wife. He took pictures and videos and masturbated. He sang songs and wrote poetry, used mirrors under the bathroom door; there were neighbors and other women/girls too.

There are many other stories too. There is evidence or they are made in court by people who know. They are not just allegations.

Powell believed he would marry his son’s wife. Even though she and her husband Josh moved out of state because of the conflict–Utah and the Mormon church provided solace–he still believed she was flirting with him.

There are more anecdotes including he wanted multiple wives and he believed women are unequal or subservient to men. He called his daughter who was there for a holiday gathering a “fucking bitch” (i.e., not supportive of his edicts and family secrets) and ordered her and her husband out of the house.

This is me against them contention.

He was given a 10-year sentence; he served some three years at age 65 for voyeurism.

TWO

In the videos before Josh Powell killed himself and his sons, he looks extremely conflicted. If this is possible, he looks as though he has intimacy problems.

In the police station, he is cowering in the corner during the interrogation in his Winter hat and coat. He is looking at no one and saying nothing.

Then a reporter shoves a camera in his face while he is getting in–the rental? police confiscated his minivan–car. Again, he is more or less looking at the ground, and says “We got a late start,” referring to the 2 AM “camping” expedition with very young children.

Prior to that trip neighbors reported a lot of car alarm noise coming from the garage. The stereo was loud and there were large fans around a wet carpet. The minivan has no trunk, but Mommy may have been in the back per the young son. There are conflicting stories that father Steven or brother Michael were along on the trip; another, a report from a gas station worker, suggests Susan was alive and there too.

From that point on Susan was no longer seen, ever, and those were the last people who saw her. (To me that, and other circumstantial evidence, was enough to arrest Josh Powell.)

While father Steven is one of the more disgusting people I have seen in the news, Josh is as pathetic as they come. Steven did it as a conspirator, leader, manipulator, and something of a “white collar” approach. Josh did it hands-on.

He couldn’t do anything right, including the murder of his wife which he was forced to follow-up with the complete destruction of his family. In his early 30’s he had a bankruptcy. Despite a degree in business from the Univ. of Washington he could not hold down a job. He wasn’t even all-in with Mormonism. This relates to almost nothing but I cannot forget it: the family had one car which Josh used–he wanted to be a realtor–and Susan rode her bicycle to work.

She seemed industrious. She was just twenty when they married. She became a licensed realtor to help his floundering careers. She was apparently a “broker” at Wells Fargo. She seemed great, but he could not love her for who she was. Past tense.

Josh seems eternally conflicted. When his wife had their first child he couldn’t go to the hospital because he had to backup his hard drive. Maybe distracted is a better word, or even tormented. Everything has to be his way, which is not the right way for others.

Brother Michael killed himself too, for the same reason.

Why? The father Steven.

More true crime

Annielytics.com is the site and Annie Cushing is her name. It is the longest, most rambling timeline of Lori Daybell in existence. I couldn’t tell on my phone if it is current or if it ever ends. If you scroll it never stops.

I don’t know what Reddit is but they have changed and now you can read it. Maybe it is the stigma of being called out if you are a dufos, but the people there are really informed. That is the only place where I learned about Barry, Janis, and the Kansas shockjock brother.

I am going to stop now because I just spent my time posting to Annie. Besides, I have Josh Powell on the mind. I learned about him and his family on East Idaho News. Nate is my buddy; just kidding. It took a lot of nerve to stick a microphone in Lori’s face and ask the tough questions, and I believe I read somewhere that the reporter is not that way. Someone had to do it. Grossbart, Grossman, Eric went along for the photo credits. I think they and others (gosh, Annie’s site mentions Justin Lum and everything else) do an excellent job where their edict is to stick to journalism.

“Honestly, when I saw her, she just looked like a survivor.”

Judy Veloz is right. She also said something–I thought it would be one of those soundbites that they repeat, but it was quick and only once–and it was not real articulate. You cannot let your story influence the story.

https://www.cbs.com/shows/48_hours/video/dPxsGbwcqdlp45V7Uiv9NLRs81bVuX5k/what-ever-happened-to-mary-day-/

It gets back to psychology and parents. And it happens everywhere all the time.

Poor Mary.

I didn’t buy the Southern accent thing for starters. I sounds more like country or uneducated to me anyway. Forget the “starters.” No one knows or could imagine the life that Mary led. Anything is possible, and that is psychology, not law enforcement.

At first 48 hours presented the detectives as extremely capable and even admirable. Geez, inventing a secret birth daughter? “The devil inside me” is probably not enough to convict for murder while often times a DNA match is.

Poor Mary. Memory lapses, alcoholism, and beatings are all about psychology too.

As is so often the case it is something else, or more accurately, something additional. The cadaver dogs are a perfect example in this one. Who knows what else went on in that household?

P.S. Go Crosley Green!